ostarella: (Writing)
More articles from Fiction Factor Newsletter
http://www.fictionfactor.com




For some of our "romantically inclined" authors:

Secrets of Writing an Old-Fashioned Romance Novel by Jessica James

http://romance.fictionfactor.com/articles/secrets.html



There was also an interesting article - How to Impress an Editor (and How To Mark yourself as an Amateur) by Lee Masterson. The full article can be found here: http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/impress.html  Although it was aimed at the professional (or wannabe professional) writer, there were some points that could also apply to fanfic writers. I've paraphrased some of these to "fit" our particular arena.

Pro - A reader wants to see a submission that is clear and easy to read.

Amateur - Who cares about the eye-strain the reader has to suffer?

Pro - Remember at all times that you are not the only person posting a story on that day.

Amateur - Demand that you be given comments precisely 24 hours after you submit your work (or you won't post the next chapter!)

Pro - Check the formatting so readers aren't looking all over for the next sentence or paragraph - or can actually tell where the next paragraph begins.

Amateur - The hell with formatting - I don't have time for that stuff...

Pro - Briefly describe your work - provide a summary that gives the reader an idea of what to expect.

Amateur - Tell the readers how much your grandma LOVED your story. Remind them again how good it is, because your best friend said it made her cry. Throw in another reminder of your brilliance and tell them you're the next Stephen King.

Pro - Double- then triple-check your work for spelling and grammar.

Amateur - Run your story through the computer spell checker and hope it caught everything. Or just rely on your own judgment. Or don't bother with any of that - after all, it's just for fun!

Pro - Realize that an honest critique is not a personal thing, even if it points out flaws in your story. This is a good thing.

Amateur - Respond to non-glowing reviews with death-threats. Or perhaps send a rude article about the self-serving nastiness of readers who don't have a clue, and definitely question the motives of the reviewer.

ostarella: (Writing)
More articles from Fiction Factor Newsletter
http://www.fictionfactor.com




For some of our "romantically inclined" authors:

Secrets of Writing an Old-Fashioned Romance Novel by Jessica James

http://romance.fictionfactor.com/articles/secrets.html



There was also an interesting article - How to Impress an Editor (and How To Mark yourself as an Amateur) by Lee Masterson. The full article can be found here: http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/impress.html  Although it was aimed at the professional (or wannabe professional) writer, there were some points that could also apply to fanfic writers. I've paraphrased some of these to "fit" our particular arena.

Pro - A reader wants to see a submission that is clear and easy to read.

Amateur - Who cares about the eye-strain the reader has to suffer?

Pro - Remember at all times that you are not the only person posting a story on that day.

Amateur - Demand that you be given comments precisely 24 hours after you submit your work (or you won't post the next chapter!)

Pro - Check the formatting so readers aren't looking all over for the next sentence or paragraph - or can actually tell where the next paragraph begins.

Amateur - The hell with formatting - I don't have time for that stuff...

Pro - Briefly describe your work - provide a summary that gives the reader an idea of what to expect.

Amateur - Tell the readers how much your grandma LOVED your story. Remind them again how good it is, because your best friend said it made her cry. Throw in another reminder of your brilliance and tell them you're the next Stephen King.

Pro - Double- then triple-check your work for spelling and grammar.

Amateur - Run your story through the computer spell checker and hope it caught everything. Or just rely on your own judgment. Or don't bother with any of that - after all, it's just for fun!

Pro - Realize that an honest critique is not a personal thing, even if it points out flaws in your story. This is a good thing.

Amateur - Respond to non-glowing reviews with death-threats. Or perhaps send a rude article about the self-serving nastiness of readers who don't have a clue, and definitely question the motives of the reviewer.

ostarella: (Default)
Couple more good articles from Fiction Factor Newsletter

http://www.fictionfactor.com

Storytelling by Lee Masterson

http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/story-telling.html

Adding Character Depth Through Perception by Lee Masterson

http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/perception.html

Enjoy!


ostarella: (Default)
Couple more good articles from Fiction Factor Newsletter

http://www.fictionfactor.com

Storytelling by Lee Masterson

http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/story-telling.html

Adding Character Depth Through Perception by Lee Masterson

http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/perception.html

Enjoy!


ostarella: (Writing)
From FictionFactor's newsletter

www.fictionfactor.com/

A neat article on an area that's often overlooked

Writing Fiction For Anthologies )
ostarella: (Writing)
From FictionFactor's newsletter

www.fictionfactor.com/

A neat article on an area that's often overlooked

Writing Fiction For Anthologies )

November 2015

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